Posted by: Erin Shilton June 26, 2017

In June 2016, Abergeldie in Joint Venture with RCR O’Donnell Griffin were awarded this project to upgrade Picton Water Recycling Plant (WRP). The upgrades are required to service future projected growth as well as the connection of a new trade waste customer (the Ingham’s Turkey Processing Facility) and the transfer of wastewater flow from Buxton and Bargo. The scope of works involve design, supply, installation, testing and commissioning of a new inlet works, new switchroom and blower building, two new intermittently decanted aerated lagoons (IDALs), two new biosolids lagoons, mechanical fitout and pipework as well as associated ancillary works. Works are progressing well with concrete works to the biosolids lagoons, switchroom and blower building slabs and IDALs now complete. Concrete works to the inlet works are well advanced and major mechanical supply items have started landing which will soon be followed by installation of these items. Major electrical works have also commenced and the project is due for completion in April 2018.

Posted by: admin November 11, 2015

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

As part of the Australian and Queensland Governments Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Program, Abergeldie completed construction of the new raw water intakes from the Burnette River at Gayndah and Mundubbera after they were destroyed in the 2011 and 2013 floods.

The pump well intake structure at Gayndah was constructed in 5m of water beside the existing Claude Wharton Weir and the well shaft was built by stacking eight precast segments on top of each other. Each segment weighed between 34 and 50 tonne.

The intake structure at Mundubberra involved the replacement of the existing jetty to suspend the water intake pumps and pipework. The jetty consists of 900mm x 10m long steel lined reinforced concrete piles socketed 3m into bedrock.

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Abergeldie were engaged to construct and commission a 3 Megalitre reservoir pump station and 400m long rising main, including conduit runs, electrical installation and hypochlorite dosing facility. Associated civil works included construction of an access road and various concrete works including a valve pit and retaining walls. Commissioning and cut in to existing mains.

Complex Challenges:

The construction site was extremely steep, with restricted access for equipment and very limited space for assembly or storage of construction components. The reservoir was constructed using steel plates, fabricated in an off-site workshop to the correct size and shape.

The plates were then transported to the site to be erected and welded piece by piece, followed by a multi-step painting process under stringent quality control conditions. The result was a solid, durable, hydrostatic steel reservoir for potable water storage.

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Custom design and installation of water treatment and recycling units in six bus depots around Brisbane: Bowen Hills, Virginia, Carina, Garden City, Richlands and Toowong. Each unit has a very small footprint and recycles approximately 453, 600 L of waste water created weekly from the cleaning and maintenance of buses.

Complex Challenges:

The first unit was designed and installed as a prototype at Virginia Bus Depot, followed by five more units at other locations after acceptance of the first. Each site presented unique challenges, with different process configurations, different water storage capacities, different bus fleet numbers and different operating environments.

Operator competency and training needs also varied from site to site. Very strict water consumption and water quality targets were specified. Regardless of site to site differences, it was strictly required that overall plant dimensions not exceed 2.6m x 1.5m x 2.5m

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

In 2004, John Young (Kelvinhaugh), which is now part of Abergeldie Complex Infrastructure, formed a joint venture with CH2MHill to design and construct a 2 ML/day membrane bioreactor with sodium hypochlorite post dosing to achieve high quality recycled water at Sydney’s North Head STP to replace the potable water previously being used.

Scope included process design, design of the concrete tank, design of the aeration system to achieve the required oxygen transfer for the high suspended solids in the reaction tank, and design of the membrane filter system to achieve the required quality, with due regard to the membrane flux for maximizing the life of the membranes and reducing the maintenance costs and associated downtime.

Complex Challenges:

The design (basic MLE) recognized that, for the given height allowed for the tank structure by the client, reducing the size of the aeration tank to the optimum SRT would reduce the floor area available for the diffusers and thus compromise an optimum aeration design.

Comprehensive commissioning was carried out following construction. Data was recorded over the 150 day proving period. Parameter tolerances included transmembrane pressures, thermotolerant coliforms, DO, ph, chemical usage, suspended solids, ammonia and plant power consumption. All were well within the specified technical parameters. At the time of its commissioning, the new facility was the largest MBR operating in Australia.

Division: Water Client: Sydney Water Corporation Current Status: Complete Start Date: August 2004 Construction Period: 60 Weeks Contract Type: Lump Sum Value: $ 3 million Consultants/designers: Abergeldie Young Process Engineering Pty Ltd

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Design, procurement, civil construction, mechanical and electrical installation and commissioning of a new recycled water treatment system. Quality of the tertiary filtered effluent is enhanced by chemical dosing, UV treatment and Chlorine contact tanks. Scope included detail design, commissioning and supply/installation all civil, mechanical, electrical, control systems and software.

The system supplies high quality recycled water that replaces approximately 1.4 Million litres per day of potable which had previously been used. Recycled water is now reticulated to Port Kembla Coal Terminal, Wollongong Golf Course and Wollongong City Council sports fields.

Complex Challenges:

The overall treatment system uses several processing elements requiring an integrated control system, incorporating sensors to detect when instruments in elements of the system lose calibration and raise appropriate alarms.

An important safety and maintenance concern was that the covers for the Chlorine contact tanks should be light and easily removable.

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Construction and commissioning of a new potable water reservoir pump station. Scope included a new pump station building, pumps and motors, transformers and transformer enclosure, prefabricated switch rooms, electrical works and control system programming, installation of a pressure vessel, pipe work, pipeline cut ins and connections, earthworks, retaining walls, pavements and storm water and all other work required for the construction of a fully operational pump station.

Complex Challenges:

Due to its remote location and a mining boom, competition for locally available skills and materials was a major obstacle. Local procurement of materials was preferred both for flexibility in managing delivery times and to reduce the carbon footprint in the delivery chain.